Trump Demands Boston Bomber Get DEATH Penalty

VIDEO — Trump Fights Back in Fiery CPAC Speech

(PoliticalLookout.com)- President Donald Trump doesn’t mess around when it comes to terrorists. On Sunday, the president demanded that the Boston Marathon Bomber, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, receive the death penalty for committing the horrifying act of terror in 2013.

A federal appeals court recently ruled to overturn the death sentence that Tsarnaev initially received, prompting Trump’s intervention on Twitter.

“Death penalty! He killed and badly wounded many,” President Trump said.

“Justice!” he added.

Trump was retweeting an article shared by Fox News anchor Sean Hannity, which announced the news of the overturning of his sentence. The First Circuit court ordered a new penalty phase in the ongoing Tsarnaev trial and argued that the first group of jurors who decided to give him the death penalty were biased as a result of the huge publicity surrounding the attack. It is hoped by the judges that a new trial will not be affected by the same level of emotion as last time.

In May 2015, Tsarnaev was sentenced to death. He was charged with killing three people and injuring more than 260 others during a bomb attack he committed with his brother Tamerlan. The bomb was detonated during the Boston Marathon and became a worldwide story instantly. After the bomb attack, the brothers murdered a police officer as they ran away from the scene.

President Trump denounced the decision during an event in Tampa, Florida, on Friday. The president appeared at an event at Tampa International Airport on the tarmac.

“I see in Boston, where you have the animal that killed so many people during the Boston Marathon, they just sent his conviction for the death penalty back to the lower courts,” he explained. “So they’ll argue about that for a long timer. It’s ridiculous. Think of that. It’s ridiculous.”

Perhaps there’s an argument to the fact that there was a lot of emotion flying around so soon after the attack happened, but if it took two years to make a decision, will another five years really change how jurors feel?